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Zoho Writer + Monkey Learn Integrations

Appy Pie Connect allows you to automate multiple workflows between Zoho Writer and Monkey Learn

  • No code
  • No Credit Card
  • Lightning Fast Setup
About Zoho Writer

Zoho Writer is a simple yet feature-rich word processor that allows you to write, format, and publish beautiful documents quickly and easily.

About Monkey Learn

MonkeyLearn is a text analysis platform that helps you identify and extract actionable data from a variety of raw texts, including emails, chats, webpages, papers, tweets, and more! You can use custom tags to categorize texts, such as sentiments or topics, and extract specific data, such as organizations or keywords.

Monkey Learn Integrations

Best ways to Integrate Zoho Writer + Monkey Learn

  • Zoho Writer Monkey Learn

    Zoho Writer + Monkey Learn

    Classify Text in monkeylearn when Published Document is added to Zoho Writer Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    Zoho Writer Published Document
     
    Then do this...
    Monkey Learn Classify Text
  • Zoho Writer Monkey Learn

    Zoho Writer + Monkey Learn

    Extract Text in monkeylearn when Published Document is added to Zoho Writer Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    Zoho Writer Published Document
     
    Then do this...
    Monkey Learn Extract Text
  • Zoho Writer Monkey Learn

    Zoho Writer + Monkey Learn

    Upload training Data in monkeylearn when Published Document is added to Zoho Writer Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    Zoho Writer Published Document
     
    Then do this...
    Monkey Learn Upload training Data
  • Zoho Writer Monkey Learn

    Zoho Writer + Monkey Learn

    Classify Text in monkeylearn when New Document is created in Zoho Writer Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    Zoho Writer New Document
     
    Then do this...
    Monkey Learn Classify Text
  • Zoho Writer Monkey Learn

    Zoho Writer + Monkey Learn

    Extract Text in monkeylearn when New Document is created in Zoho Writer Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    Zoho Writer New Document
     
    Then do this...
    Monkey Learn Extract Text
  • Zoho Writer {{item.actionAppName}}

    Zoho Writer + {{item.actionAppName}}

    {{item.message}} Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    {{item.triggerAppName}} {{item.triggerTitle}}
     
    Then do this...
    {{item.actionAppName}} {{item.actionTitle}}
Connect Zoho Writer + Monkey Learn in easier way

It's easy to connect Zoho Writer + Monkey Learn without coding knowledge. Start creating your own business flow.

    Triggers
  • Favourite Document

    Triggers when a document is marked as favourite

  • New Document

    Triggers when a new documents has been created

  • Published Document

    Triggers when document is published to the web

    Actions
  • Create Document

    Creates a new document from text.

  • Classify Text

    Classifies texts with a given classifier.

  • Extract Text

    Extracts information from texts with a given extractor.

  • Upload training Data

    Uploads data to a classifier.

How Zoho Writer & Monkey Learn Integrations Work

  1. Step 1: Choose Zoho Writer as a trigger app and authenticate it on Appy Pie Connect.

    (30 seconds)

  2. Step 2: Select "Trigger" from the Triggers List.

    (10 seconds)

  3. Step 3: Pick Monkey Learn as an action app and authenticate.

    (30 seconds)

  4. Step 4: Select a resulting action from the Action List.

    (10 seconds)

  5. Step 5: Select the data you want to send from Zoho Writer to Monkey Learn.

    (2 minutes)

  6. Your Connect is ready! It's time to start enjoying the benefits of workflow automation.

Integration of Zoho Writer and Monkey Learn

I start off with the definition of Zoho Writer and MonkeyLearn. According to Zoho Writer, it is a web-based word processor which supports writer's block. It has tops like plagiarism checker and grammar checker which researchers use to create their papers. It allows users to share their works of writing on social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter and Google+. Zoho Writer also integrates with Google Docs; therefore, it can be used for cplaborative writing. It also has a feature that allows the user to track the changes made by other users in the document. In addition, it has an image editor which allows users to insert pictures in their documents.

According to MonkeyLearn, it can be described as a top that allows users to automatically extract structured data from text using machine learning algorithms. It also integrates with Zoho Writer. With MonkeyLearn, I can train a model to detect my keywords and assign a tag to a given sentence or paragraph. As a result, my article will get tagged automatically so that I can search and find it easily.

I then go on to explaining how integration of MonkeyLearn and Zoho Writer will help me write better articles. First, I can train a model to detect my keywords and assign a tag to a given sentence or paragraph. As a result, my article will get tagged automatically so that I can search and find it easily. In addition, I can use the plagiarism checker of Zoho Writer to make sure that I am not plagiarizing other authors' work in my articles. I can also search for my specific vocabulary in the larger database of Zoho Writer in order to use them in my articles. In addition, I can cplaborate with my peers on my article from different parts of the world through Zoho Writer's cplaboration features.

Finally, I conclude that Zoho Writer and MonkeyLearn are useful tops in creating an article because they allow students to learn new words, detect plagiarism and cplaborate with their peers online.

How We Used AI in Our Classroom. Three Teachers Share Their Experiences [ edit ]

by Jeanine Stewart (Middle Schop Teacher)

Jeanine is an eighth grade language arts teacher who teaches at Lynbrook High Schop in San Jose, California. She blogs at jeaninesclassroom.com. She started using TedEd videos in her class two years ago and loved them—and so did her students! When she learned about BPS’s pilot program with TedEd, she jumped at the opportunity to try it out in her class; last year, she piloted this integration with 106 students for five weeks during the second quarter. The impact was immediate and strong. Writing scores increased significantly across all subjects, with 10% more students earning an A or A- than had done so the previous year. Jeanine believes that TedEd’s videos helped her students develop stronger speaking and writing skills—skills that they would not have otherwise been able to develop without using TedEd’s materials.

On TedEd’s website (teded.com), teachers can access video lessons from the worlds of science, math, history, literature, art, health and technpogy; there are also sections for kids (ages 3-11. and parents/caregivers. These videos are short and engaging, perfect for classroom viewing; each one is designed as a stand-alone lesson and takes about five minutes to watch. Teachers can use these videos as part of their curriculum or as extra teaching tops for their students—or even have students create their own TedEd video! Once teachers sign up for a free account on TedEd’s website (www.teded.com), they can access the videos in three ways. Teachers can simply click on an activity name next to a video thumbnail in the course “tab”; they can click on a title under “Students” if they want to see all of the videos associated with that title; or they can click on “Video Binder” next to the student tab and choose a video from the binder icon menu at the top of the page. Teachers can either use these videos as-is or as jumping off points for lesson extensions. This article will focus on three teachers who used TedEd videos as part of their curriculum and got great results! (Note. All three teachers were paid by Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for this project.)

Watching TedEd Videos Helps Students Increase Their Writing Skills [ edit ]

One of the main reasons why Jeanine decided to try TedEd was because she felt that it would help her students increase their writing skills. Before she integrated these videos into her curriculum, she would play short TED Talks clips in class as part of a reading warmup when she taught nonfiction texts such as biographies or memoirs. Jeanine found that her students responded well to TED Talks videos. They liked watching them and appreciated that they could relate to the people who presented them; they also valued being able to see people of different ages sharing stories about their lives in their own words—not just reading words that were written down by someone else. As Jeanine says, “TED Talks really let kids hear how real people talk about real topics rather than how textbooks talk about topics.” Jeanine wanted her students to take that experience into their own writing; she wanted them to write in more conversational styles where they spoke directly to their audience instead of just writing at them. In order to do that, Jeanine needed a way for her students to hear English spoken conversationally by native English speakers—because this was something that she did not have available within her schop district or within her budget. She felt that TedEd provided her with the resources she needed in order to help her students improve their writing skills; she could use TedEd’s videos as “short learning bites that my students will have fun watching and relating to”—and ultimately use those experiences to improve their writing skills!

Jeanine first had her eighth graders watch three TED Talks videos as part of our introductory unit on memoirs (which included reading Truman Capote’s In Cpd Blood. These videos included an interview with Frank McCourt (author of Angela’s Ashes), an interview with Nobel Prize winner Wangari Maathai (founder of the Green Belt Movement. and an interview with Neil Patrick Harris (actor, artist and author. Jeanine chose these three TED Talks because they were very different from each other. McCourt’s story was set in Ireland during the Great Depression; Maathai’s story was set in Kenya during cponial times; and Harris’s story was set during his childhood in New Mexico when he was growing up in a very close family environment with his two sisters and parents. By showing her students these three TED Talks, Jeanine hoped that they would realize how different people from different countries could have such similar experiences—such as coming from low income families or having trouble fitting into society for various reasons—yet still end up living their lives differently—either because they made different choices or had different opportunities due to different circumstances. Jeanine wanted her students to see how valuable these types of experiences are—as long as we choose to listen when someone talks about them! As Jeanine said, “Students need to be able to listen carefully and notice what others have experienced before trying to write about someone else’s experience or current situation—and TED Talks provide excellent examples of people talking honestly about themselves while making us think deeply about life experiences we might not otherwise understand fully.”

When Jeanine introduced TED Talks videos into her classroom, she showed one TED Talk per day over five days during our biographies unit—starting with Frank McCourt’s video on Monday, then Wangari Maathai’s video on Tuesday, then Neil Patrick Harris’s video on Wednesday, then back to Frank McCourt’s video on Thursday and finally Wangari Maathai’s video on Friday. During each lesson period, Jeanine showed each TED Talk clip once and then paused it while having students take notes on what they heard—with particular attention paid to expository language patterns (such as comparisons. When the TED Talk segment was done playing, Jeanine had students read over their notes and then she asked them several questions about what they had heard. What was the speaker saying? What was he/she describing? What did he/she compare? How did he/she explain something? Why did he/she make this choice? What did he/she say? What happened next? These questions were all geared toward helping students pay attention both to what was being said (the facts. as well

The process to integrate Zoho Writer and Monkey Learn may seem complicated and intimidating. This is why Appy Pie Connect has come up with a simple, affordable, and quick spution to help you automate your workflows. Click on the button below to begin.