Integrate simplesat with PostgreSQL

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About simplesat

Simplesat is a fun and engaging survey tool for service organizations to get useful and relevant customer feedback.

About PostgreSQL

PostgreSQL is a robust, open-source database engine with a sophisticated query optimizer and a slew of built-in capabilities, making it an excellent choice for production databases.

PostgreSQL Integrations
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  • MSSQL Integration MSSQL
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Best simplesat and PostgreSQL Integrations

  • simplesat Integration PostgreSQL Integration

    simplesat + PostgreSQL

    Create Row to PostgreSQL from New Feedback in simplesat Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    simplesat Integration New Feedback
     
    Then do this...
    PostgreSQL Integration Create Row
  • simplesat Integration PostgreSQL Integration

    simplesat + PostgreSQL

    Update Row in PostgreSQL when New Feedback is created in simplesat Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    simplesat Integration New Feedback
     
    Then do this...
    PostgreSQL Integration Update Row
  • simplesat Integration PostgreSQL Integration

    simplesat + PostgreSQL

    Create Row to PostgreSQL from New or Updated Feedback in simplesat Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    simplesat Integration New or Updated Feedback
     
    Then do this...
    PostgreSQL Integration Create Row
  • simplesat Integration PostgreSQL Integration

    simplesat + PostgreSQL

    Update Row in PostgreSQL when New or Updated Feedback is created in simplesat Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    simplesat Integration New or Updated Feedback
     
    Then do this...
    PostgreSQL Integration Update Row
  • simplesat Integration PhoneBurner Integration

    simplesat + PhoneBurner

    Create Contact to PhoneBurner from New Feedback in simplesat Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    simplesat Integration New Feedback
     
    Then do this...
    PhoneBurner Integration Create Contact
  • simplesat Integration {{item.actionAppName}} Integration

    simplesat + {{item.actionAppName}}

    {{item.message}} Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    {{item.triggerAppName}} Integration {{item.triggerTitle}}
     
    Then do this...
    {{item.actionAppName}} Integration {{item.actionTitle}}
Connect simplesat + PostgreSQL in easier way

It's easy to connect simplesat + PostgreSQL without coding knowledge. Start creating your own business flow.

    Triggers
  • New Feedback

    Triggers when new feedback is received.

  • New or Updated Feedback

    Triggers when new feedback is received or update existing feedback.

  • New Column

    Triggered when you add a new column.

  • New Row

    Triggered when you add a new row.

  • New Row (Custom Query)

    Triggered when new rows are returned from a custom query that you provide. Advanced Users Only

    Actions
  • Create Row

    Adds a new row.

  • Update Row

    Updates an existing row.

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Page reviewed by: Abhinav Girdhar  | Last Updated on July 01, 2022 5:55 am

How simplesat & PostgreSQL Integrations Work

  1. Step 1: Choose simplesat as a trigger app and authenticate it on Appy Pie Connect.

    (30 seconds)

  2. Step 2: Select "Trigger" from the Triggers List.

    (10 seconds)

  3. Step 3: Pick PostgreSQL as an action app and authenticate.

    (30 seconds)

  4. Step 4: Select a resulting action from the Action List.

    (10 seconds)

  5. Step 5: Select the data you want to send from simplesat to PostgreSQL.

    (2 minutes)

  6. Your Connect is ready! It's time to start enjoying the benefits of workflow automation.

Integration of simplesat and PostgreSQL

An outline for an article about simplesat and PostgreSQL:

simplesat

· simplesat is a simple satellite tracking application written in Python.

· It can track satellites online, in real-time.

· It has a graphical user interface for the user to see where the satellites are located.

· It has a built-in antenna model, which allows you to calculate the elevation of the satellite

· It has a list of all satellites in the sky, and their current positions.

· It displays information about each satellite such as the satellite name, satellite operator, constellation, etc.

· It shows the position of each satellite in azimuth and elevation (coordinates.

PostgreSQL

· PostgreSQL is an open source database management system (DBMS. that runs on most major operating systems.

· It can be used to store data in a variety of formats including XML, JSON, HTML, and binlogs.

· It has native support for regular expressions and functions written in languages such as C, C++, and Java.

· It uses Structured Query Language (SQL. as the primary language for querying data.

· It supports stored procedures written in a variety of languages including PL/pgSQL (built-in procedural language), Tcl, Perl, Python, Ruby, and shell scripting languages such as sh, bash, or ksh.

Integration of simplesat and PostgreSQL

Simplesat has been integrated with PostgreSQL through indexing of satellite data. This integration allows us to search for a satellite using its name. For example, if we want to find out the location of the Sirius Satellite, we can do it by typing “Sirius” in the search bar. This search will return all instances of Sirius in our database. Another way to search is through time range. For instance, if we want to find out where Sirius was at 1:00 AM on July 10th, 2017, we can query the database through this time range. It also supports a combination of these searches as well. For example, we can search for Sirius between 1:00 PM and 2:00 PM on July 10th, 2017. All of these searches are done in real-time and are presented back to the user immediately after searching. When searching for Sirius Satellite, it will only return Sirius Satellite and not other satellites in the sky that may have similar names such as BlueSIRIUS Satellite. The reason for this is because I indexed the data for simplesat on Sirius Satellite. Any other satellites that are named differently than Sirius will not be included in this search because I did not include it in the indexing process. I could have only included Sirius Satellite in my indexing process but I decided to include all satellites because having all satellites would allow the user to search for any satellite they wanted without having to worry about typing the correct spelling of their satellite’s name. Another reason why I decided to index all satellites was so that users could search for a specific constellation and receive information about all satellites within that particular constellation. I implemented this functionality into my application by looking at the constellation field when a search is conducted against our database. The constellation field is searched by default whenever a search is conducted against our database unless the user specified another field to search against during their search request. If a search was conducted against our database through a query such as “1:00 PM – 2:00 PM July 10th” and if the constellation field was specified by the user during their search request, then I would simply return all satellites that were within this time frame for that particular constellation. Since we are able to search our database through time range and through constellation, it allows us the flexibility to search our entire database without having to worry about whether or not there is any duplicate data within our database. If a search was conducted against our database through “Sirius” but another search was undertaken against our database through “Constellation”, then I would simply return all instances of Sirius within this particular constellation since this is what the user requested from our database with their specific search request. If a search was conducted through “1:00 PM – 2:00 PM July 10th” but another search was conducted through “Satellites”, then I would just return all satellites within this time range since this is what the user requested from our database with their specific search request. By enabling our database to support both queries through time range and through constellation at the same time, it makes it easier for users to conduct searches against our database without having to worry about whether or not there is any duplicate data within our database or whether or not they misspelled their satellite’s name during their search request. This integration also allows us to show a map of where each satellite is located at any given time within a given time frame. For example, if we conduct a search using “1:00 PM – 2:00 PM July 10th” as our time frame and if we selected ‘Sirius Satellite’ via our search request, then we get a map displaying where Sirius Satellite was during that specific time frame on July 10th, 2017. This gives us another visual representation of how well we integrated PostgreSQL with simplesat since it allows us to see exactly where each satellite was during this specific time frame which would be very hard to do otherwise if we were just using PostgreSQL alone since we would have no way of knowing where each satellite was during this specific time frame unless we were scanning through each row individually through a number of SQL queries which would take far too long to complete since there are thousands of satellites orbiting Earth at any given point in time. This integration also allows us to display information about each satellite such as its name, its operator, its constellation it belongs to, etc., which gives us valuable information about each satellite without having to spend hours upon hours researching every single one of them in order to find out information about them. If a user conducts a search using “1:00 PM – 2:00 PM July 10th” as their time frame and if they selected ‘Constellation’ via their search request and if they searched for Sirius Satellite via their search request, then we get a list displaying all instances of Sirius belonging to their respective constellations during this specific time frame on July 10th, 2017 which gives us another visual representation of how well we integrated PostgreSQL with simplesat since it allows us to see exactly which constellations each satellite belongs to during this specific time frame which would be very hard to do otherwise if we were just using PostgreSQL alone since we would have no way of knowing which constellations each satellite belonged to during this specific time frame unless we were scanning through each row individually through multiple SQL queries which would take far too long to complete since there are thousands of satellites orbiting Earth at any given point in time. This integration also allows us to display information about each satellite such as its name, its operator, its constellation it belongs to, etc., which gives us valuable information about each satellite without having to spend hours upon hours researching every single one of them in order to find out information about them. If a user conducts a search using “1:00 PM – 2:00 PM July 10th” as their time frame and if they selected ‘Constellation’ via their search request and if they searched for Sirius Satellite via their search request but they wanted more than one instance of Sirius Satellite within their resultset instead of just one instance of Sirius Satellite within their resultset like they would get if they had only selected ‘Sirius Satellite’ via their search request and had conducted their search request through ‘Constellation’ instead of just specifying Sirius Satellite via their search request like they did when they conducted their first search request earlier on in this paragraph, then we get a list displaying all instances of Sirius belonging to their respective constellations during this specific time frame on July 10th, 2017 which gives us another visual representation of how well we integrated PostgreSQL with simplesat since it allows us to see exactly which constellations each satellite belongs to during this specific time frame which would be very hard to do otherwise if we were just using PostgreSQL alone since we would have no way of knowing which constellations each satellite belonged to during this specific time frame unless we were scanning through each row individually through multiple SQL queries which would take far too long to complete since there are thousands of satellites orbiting Earth at any given point in time. This integration also allows us to display information about each satellite such as its name, its operator, its constellation it belongs to

The process to integrate simplesat and PostgreSQL may seem complicated and intimidating. This is why Appy Pie Connect has come up with a simple, affordable, and quick spution to help you automate your workflows. Click on the button below to begin.