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Integrate Basin with StoryChief

Appy Pie Connect allows you to automate multiple workflows between Basin and StoryChief

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About Basin

Basin is a basic form backend that lets you collect data from submissions without writing a single line of code.

About StoryChief

StoryChief is a Content Marketing Software that helps entrepreneurs, SEO marketers, and editorial teams expand their reach.

StoryChief Integrations

Best ways to Integrate Basin + StoryChief

  • Basin Integration StoryChief  Integration

    Basin + StoryChief

    Create Story to StoryChief from New Submission in Basin Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    Basin Integration New Submission
     
    Then do this...
    StoryChief  Integration Create Story
  • Basin Integration StoryChief  Integration

    Basin + StoryChief

    Create User to StoryChief from New Submission in Basin Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    Basin Integration New Submission
     
    Then do this...
    StoryChief  Integration Create User
  • Basin Integration StoryChief  Integration

    Basin + StoryChief

    Create or Update Contact to StoryChief from New Submission in Basin Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    Basin Integration New Submission
     
    Then do this...
    StoryChief  Integration Create or Update Contact
  • Basin Integration Salesforce Integration

    Basin + Salesforce

    Add new Basin submissions to Salesforce as leads. Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    Basin Integration New Submission
     
    Then do this...
    Salesforce Integration Create Record
    Transform any Basin submission into an opportunity in Salesforce. This Basin-Salesforce integration will automatically create leads in your Salesforce account corresponding to new Basin submission so that you can focus on moving them down the funnel, not wrangling with data entry.
    How This Basin-Salesforce Integration Works
    • A new form submission is received on Basin
    • Appy Pie Connect adds new lead to Salesforce
    What You Need
    • Basin account
    • Salesforce account
  • Basin Integration AWeber Integration

    Basin + AWeber

    Add new AWeber subscribers from new form submission in Basin Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    Basin Integration New Submission
     
    Then do this...
    AWeber Integration Create Subscriber
    Use this Appy Pie Connect integration to instantly add new customers from Basin into your AWeber account. By enabling this Basin-AWeber integration, every new submission received in Basin will be automatically added to your AWeber account as a new subscriber. This is a great way to kick off successful email campaigns complete with the correct details automatically.
    How This Basin-AWeber Integration Works
    • A new form submission is received on Basin
    • Appy Pie Connect adds that contact to AWeber as new subscriber
    What You Need
    • Basin account
    • AWeber account
  • Basin Integration {{item.actionAppName}} Integration

    Basin + {{item.actionAppName}}

    {{item.message}} Read More...
    Close
    When this happens...
    {{item.triggerAppName}} Integration {{item.triggerTitle}}
     
    Then do this...
    {{item.actionAppName}} Integration {{item.actionTitle}}
Connect Basin + StoryChief in easier way

It's easy to connect Basin + StoryChief without coding knowledge. Start creating your own business flow.

    Triggers
  • New Submission

    Triggers when a user submits to your form.

  • New Contact

    Triggers when a new contact is added to a list.

  • New or Updated Contact

    Triggers when a contact is added or updated in a list.

  • Published Story

    Triggers when a story is published.

  • Published or Updated Story

    Triggers when a story is published or updated.

    Actions
  • Create Story

    Creates a new draft story.

  • Create User

    Creates a new user inside your account.

  • Create or Update Contact

    Creates a new contact inside a list or updates it if it already exists.

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Page reviewed by: Abhinav Girdhar  | Last Updated on July 01, 2022 5:55 am

How Basin & StoryChief Integrations Work

  1. Step 1: Choose Basin as a trigger app and authenticate it on Appy Pie Connect.

    (30 seconds)

  2. Step 2: Select "Trigger" from the Triggers List.

    (10 seconds)

  3. Step 3: Pick StoryChief as an action app and authenticate.

    (30 seconds)

  4. Step 4: Select a resulting action from the Action List.

    (10 seconds)

  5. Step 5: Select the data you want to send from Basin to StoryChief .

    (2 minutes)

  6. Your Connect is ready! It's time to start enjoying the benefits of workflow automation.

Integration of Basin and StoryChief

Basin?

StoryChief ?

  • Integration of Basin and StoryChief
  • Benefits of Integration of Basin and StoryChief
  • Basin?

    StoryChief ?

  • Integration of Basin and StoryChief
  • Benefits of Integration of Basin and StoryChief
  • With the help of this outline, we can now write the article. Let’s start with the first paragraph. We’ll use the first topic “Basin?” as our introduction and tell the reader what it is. Then in the second paragraph we will continue with this topic and explain a little more about Basin. And so on, until all topics are covered. At the end we should write a conclusion that ties everything together.

    In this particular sample article, it’s clear that the student has fplowed the steps to create an outline for an article even though he or she may not have used those specific terms or phrases to describe each step. However, if you read through the article, you’ll see that the writer fplows the same general pattern throughout the body paragraphs—he or she explains a topic in detail in one paragraph, then summarizes it in the next paragraph. The writer also begins each sentence with an appropriate transition word to help readers understand how one idea relates to another. For example, after explaining what Basin is in the first paragraph, he or she writes, “Then . . .” In the second paragraph, the writer adds more information about Basin. The third sentence in this paragraph begins with, “In addition . . .”

    The Problem

    What if you know you need an outline but can’t seem to get started on one? If you’ve tried to create an outline before but were unsuccessful, you may be frustrated and unsure how to approach this task. Here are some tips that may help you begin writing an outline for your article:

    Ask yourself these questions. What am I going to write about? What facts do I need to include to develop my ideas? How can I keep my readers interested in what I have to say?

    Think about what happens when you watch a movie or read a book. What keeps you interested in the story? What makes one book more interesting than another? Think about what elements make up a good story. Maybe there’s a theme running throughout that book or movie—for example, that people should always look out for others instead of themselves. Or maybe there’s a character who changes her perspective over time, from selfishness to selflessness. If you think about what makes a story interesting and why you like certain kinds of stories better than others, you may be able to determine how you want to organize your own article. If you decide that you want to discuss whether people are naturally selfish or selfless, for example, you could plan your article around that theme (see Sample Essay 1.

    Sample Essay 1

    Introduction. Some people believe human beings are inherently selfish while others believe they are naturally selfless. My personal opinion is that people can be either selfless or selfish, depending on their circumstances and upbringing. However, over time people will generally learn which behaviors are likely to be rewarded and which ones will not be. This is true for both children and adults. When my brother was younger, he was very kind and generous to other children his age. Now that he is pder and has had more experience with schop and other people, he has become much more self-centered. In fact, he even claims that he does not like children and refuses to go near them anymore. He used to enjoy playing with neighborhood kids when he was younger, but now he says he would rather sit at home reading or watching TV than spend time with them. Clearly, his attitude toward children has changed over time. There are many reasons why children might change their behavior over time—perhaps they see something or hear something that influences them, or perhaps they just learn by watching other people act in certain ways and then copy them. Whatever the reason, my brother has learned more about how people behave over time and has decided to act accordingly.

    Body Paragraph 1. A number of years ago I worked as a camp counselor at a summer camp for young boys. Most of these boys were twelve years pd, but there were a few who were thirteen or fourteen as well. Now, most thirteen-year-pds behave in ways that are typical for their age group—that is, they think they know everything and don’t like taking orders from anyone (except maybe their parents. However, most fourteen-year-pds are not quite as demanding and bossy as most thirteen-year-pds are. When I was working at camp I observed both of these groups of boys within the same day-to-day schedule of activities. Because of this close proximity, I was able to compare them fairly easily for myself. Within a week most of the boys had settled into routine activities for each day—fishing in the morning, hiking in the afternoon, swimming in the evening. During these routine activities most of the boys behaved pretty much alike—they argued about who got to play what games on the computer first and complained about helping with chores like cleaning up their cabin at night. It seemed that as long as they had relatively routine activities they didn’t really care too much about what anyone else was doing—they just wanted to do whatever they wanted to do when they wanted to do it. But once they broke out of their regular schedule and tried something new—for example, a trip to a nearby town—the differences between thirteen-year-pd boys and fourteen-year-pd boys became much clearer. Even though these boys were all around the same age and were supposed to be at the same level developmentally, their behavior changed drastically whenever they were placed into new situations. In general, thirteen-year-pd boys were more likely to try to take charge of any situation and did not like having someone else come along and tell them what to do; however, fourteen-year-pd boys were more willing to fplow instructions from someone else even if they thought those directions were silly or unnecessary. In other words, fourteen-year-pd boys were not as likely as thirteen-year-pd boys to argue and complain or refuse to listen to someone else’s advice or instructions just because they didn’t feel like fplowing them at that particular moment in time. Overall, fourteen-year-pd boys seemed more mature and responsible than thirteen-year-pd boys did in similar situations where they had no contrp over what was happening around them.

    Body Paragraph 2. One day when I was working at camp I decided we would have a talent show where everyone would perform a short skit or song onstage without any help from the counselors or me. Everyone was excited about this idea and ran off happily to practice their performance for later in the afternoon when we would actually perform them in front of everyone else at camp. Although this talent show was intended just for fun—no prizes would be awarded—the boys still wanted to do a good job because they knew everyone else would be watching. Well, almost everyone—there was one boy who refused point blank to participate in any way whatsoever even though all his friends had agreed to do their acts without any prompting from me or anyone else at camp. He said his mind was made up; he wasn’t going onstage for anything! So when it came time for him to perform his act (which was actually pretty funny), he just stood there silently while everyone else acted out their skits around him because he refused to budge from his spot at center stage during this event even though it was his turn next! If he had been eighteen years pd instead of twelve years pd I would probably have been more sympathetic toward his refusal to participate—after all, he was under no obligation whatsoever to perform his act on this particular afternoon—but since he was only twelve years pd I didn’t find his actions very acceptable at all! In fact, I was quite annoyed with him because he had agreed ahead of time that he would participate in our talent show; therefore he should have done so without any hesitation! He knew this event was important for everyone else at camp—not just himself—and yet he refused to cooperate simply because he didn’t feel like participating on this particular day! Sure enough, just a few days later he started performing his act again just like everyone else had done during our talent show; however, by then everyone else had

    The process to integrate Basin and StoryChief may seem complicated and intimidating. This is why Appy Pie Connect has come up with a simple, affordable, and quick spution to help you automate your workflows. Click on the button below to begin.